Trelegy Ellipta Inhaler Device
Trelegy Ellipta Dose & Device

COPD triple therapy delivered in the Ellipta device

Dosing | The recommended and maximum dose is one inhalation of Trelegy Ellipta 92/55/22 micrograms once daily, at the same time each day. If a dose is missed the next dose should be inhaled at the usual time the next day.¹

An easy-to-use COPD inhaler helps your patient receive the right dose²⁻⁴

Poor inhaler technique could be a reason why a patient's COPD symptoms are poorly controlled.⁴ Significantly fewer COPD patients made a critical error* with the Ellipta inhaler compared with other commonly used COPD inhalers after reading the patient information leaflet (p<0.001 for all comparisons).³

Click a device to compare critical error data.

Graph showing critical errors data comparison between Ellipta device and MDI

4.8x fewer patients

made a critical error* with Ellipta vs. MDI

(Ellipta 13%; MDI 60%, p<0.001

*Critical errors defined as errors that are likely to result in no, or minimal, medication being delivered to the lung³

Single visit, placebo inhaler, crossover comparison in patients naïve to Ellipta and the comparator inhalers³

Critical errors: Ellipta vs. MDI (n=80) 13% (10/80) vs. 60% (48/80)³
 

Graph showing critical errors data comparison between Ellipta device and turbohaler

5.5x fewer patients

made a critical error* vs. Turbohaler

(Ellipta 8%; Turbohaler 44%, p<0.001

*Critical errors defined as errors that are likely to result in no, or minimal, medication being delivered to the lung³

Single visit, placebo inhaler, crossover comparison in patients naïve to Ellipta and the comparator inhalers³

Critical errors: Ellipta vs. Turbohaler (n=100) 8% vs. 44%

How can COPD inhaler choice play a role in reducing carbon emissions?

The NHS Long Term plan aims to reduce the carbon impact of inhalers by 50% by 2030.⁵ ⁶ Are you aware of the environmental impact of common inhaler devices?

Metered Dose Inhaler (pMDI)

  • Use hydrofluorocarbons as a propellant (powerful greenhouses gases)⁵
  • In 2018, these propellants were estimated to be responsible for 4% of NHS’ entire carbon footprint⁵
  • A pMDI has a carbon footprint that is 18x higher than a DPI⁷

Ellipta Dry Powder Inhaler (DPI)

  • A propellant-free dry powder inhaler
  • DPIs usually have a lower carbon footprint than MDIs⁷
Carbon footprint of inhaler devices

MDIs may still be the appropriate option for some patients and play an important role where there is clinical need and a DPI is not appropriate.

British Thoracic Society position statement (2020) has provided recommendation on the use of low carbon inhalers where clinically safe and appropriate to do so⁵

In order to provide guidance on clinically appropriate and safe means by which the environmental impact of inhaler prescribing can be reduced, BTS recommends the following:

  • When a new class of inhaler is commenced, this is a Dry Powder Inhaler (DPI).⁵
  • Where patients are using several classes of inhalers, and poor technique is identified with one device, that the DPI class is prioritised if the patient is able to use this safely.⁵
  • During all respiratory reviews, prescribers recommend low carbon alternatives to patients currently using pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), where patients are able to use these safely.⁵

Read the full 2020 BTS Position statement here.

BTS only advocates a device type. It does not endorse specific devices or medicines.

How to Use the Trelegy Ellipta Inhaler

See how easy it is for patients to use the Ellipta inhaler device as part of daily life.

Support your patients starting on Trelegy Ellipta

Footnotes

ICS, inhaled corticosteroid; LABA, long-acting β₂-agonist; LAMA, long-acting muscarinic antagonist; DPI, dry powder inhaler; MDI, metered-dose inhaler; pMDI, pressurised metered-dose inhaler, OD, once daily.

Trelegy Ellipta OD is indicated for maintenance treatment in adult patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are not adequately treated by a combination of an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting β₂-agonist or a combination of a long-acting β₂-agonist and a long-acting muscarinic antagonist.¹

Trelegy Ellipta is generally well tolerated. Common adverse reactions include: headache, nasopharyngitis, influenza, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia, back pain, rhinitis, cough, pharyngitis, arthralgia, sinusitis, oropharyngeal pain, bronchitis, constipation, candidiasis of mouth and throat, urinary tract infection.¹

In common with other corticosteroid-containing medicines, there is an increased risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD treated with Trelegy Ellipta.¹

References

  1. Trelegy Ellipta SmPC
  2. Svedsater H et al BMC Pulm Med 2013; 13:1–14.
  3. van der Palen J et al. NPJ Prim Care Respir Med 2016;26:16079.
  4. Riley JH et al. Int J Chron Obstruct Pulm Dis 2016;11:1873–1880.
  5. British Thoracic Society (BTS) (2020) Position Statement: Environment and Lung Health. https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/about-us/position-statements/
  6. The NHS Long Term Plan: https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan/
  7. Hillman, T. Mortimer, F and Hopkinson, N. (2013). Inhaled drugs and global warming: time to shift to dry powder inhalers. British Medical Journal. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.f3359.
  8. Panigone, S. Et al. (2020). Environmental impact of inhalers for respiratory diseases: decreasing the carbon footprint while preserving patient-tailored treatment. British Medical Journal https://bmjopenrespres.bmj.com/content/bmjresp/7/1/e000571.full.pdf
  9. Bosnic-Anticevich S, et al. Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017;12:59–71

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/ or search for MHRA Yellowcard in the Google Play or Apple App store. Adverse events should also be reported to GlaxoSmithKline on 0800 221 441.

© 2020 GSK Group of Companies or its licensor
Trademarks are the property of their respective owners
Trelegy Ellipta was developed in collaboration with

PM-GB-FVU-WCNT-200008 | July 2020